Radio Juxtapoz ep 053: Reinventing, Reimagining and Retelling the American Story with Bisa Butler

Radio Juxtapoz ep 053: Reinventing, Reimagining and Retelling the American Story with Bisa Butler
It’s a new season here at Radio Juxtapoz, and where we were hoping that Fall would bring back art openings and a sense of normalcy to our already tumultuous year, we are still a bit in flux. This month we released our newest Fall 2020 Quarterly edition with cover artist Bisa Butler, whose phenomenal and critically-acclaimed year has become symbolic of the transitions Americans have experienced in terms of social justice this past summer. The murders of Breonna Taylor, George Floyd and many others have sparked a milestone reckoning and tidal movement of conversation and activism about race, a re-examination of history and what the future can be.

Art exhibition examines what mass culture tells us about 21st-century society

Varnette Honeywood, Let's Party, 1980. Collage on board; 30 x 40 in (76.2 x 101.6 cm). Courtesy the Eric Firestone Gallery and South Etna Montauk.

Long before Andy Warhol started screen printing duplicates of Marilyn Monroe, philosopher Siegfried Kracauer was among the first 20th-century thinkers to seriously contemplate mass culture.

One of the founders of the Frankfurt School of sociopolitical thought, he examined the ways popular activities, such as amusement parks, shopping arcades, dance halls and cinema, contained more profound revelations about the nature of society. Now a new art exhibition in Montauk, New York transposes his ideas to the 21st century.

Curated by Alison M. Gingeras in collaboration with artist Katie Stout, Mass Ornament: Pleasure, Play, and What Lies Beneath, features the work of a diverse group of artists and designers, including Derrick Adams, Thomas Barger, Louis Fratino and Terri Friedman.

The works shown here favour maximalism: seductive surfaces, brilliant colours, exuberant patterns, and baroque forms. Paintings and vessels, sculptures and lamps, drawings and chairs all take ‘pleasure and play’ as their subject and, in many cases, camouflage more subversive intentions and messages.

The exhibition at South Etna Montauk, 6 South Etna Avenue, is open to the public Thursday through Sunday from 11-6pm and by appointment. Social distancing is being observed in accordance with guidelines to ensure the health and safety of both staff and visitors.

Gaetano Pesce, Pratt Chair #7 1984/2018 (Red), 2019. Polyurethane resin, Smooth-On pigment; 37 x 19 x 20 in (94 x 48.3 x 50.8 cm). Courtesy the artist, Salon 94, and South Etna Montauk.

Gaetano Pesce, Pratt Chair #7 1984/2018 (Red), 2019. Polyurethane resin, Smooth-On pigment; 37 x 19 x 20 in (94 x 48.3 x 50.8 cm). Courtesy the artist, Salon 94, and South Etna Montauk.

Brian Rochefort, Paint Can #5, 2019. Ceramic, glaze; 9 1/2 x 10 x 10 in (24.1 x 25.4 x 25.4 cm). Courtesy the artist and South Etna Montauk.

Brian Rochefort, Paint Can #5, 2019. Ceramic, glaze; 9 1/2 x 10 x 10 in (24.1 x 25.4 x 25.4 cm). Courtesy the artist and South Etna Montauk.

Derrick Adams, Floater 88, 2020. Acrylic paint, pencil, fabric on paper collage, on paper; each: 50 x 50 in (127 x 127 cm) overall: 50 x 100 in (127 x 254 cm). Courtesy the artist, Salon 94, and South Etna Montauk.

Derrick Adams, Floater 88, 2020. Acrylic paint, pencil, fabric on paper collage, on paper; each: 50 x 50 in (127 x 127 cm) overall: 50 x 100 in (127 x 254 cm). Courtesy the artist, Salon 94, and South Etna Montauk.

Terri Friedman, Laughter is Carbonated Holiness, 2020. Cotton, chenille, wool, acrylic fibers; 41 x 54 in (104.1 x 137.2 cm). Courtesty the artist and South Etna Montauk.

Terri Friedman, Laughter is Carbonated Holiness, 2020. Cotton, chenille, wool, acrylic fibers; 41 x 54 in (104.1 x 137.2 cm). Courtesty the artist and South Etna Montauk.

AI ‘artist’ creates new work inspired by Jean-Michel Basquiat

Untitled (b88Z0a5f-d7cb) (Snoop Dogg)

Can computers paint? According to Urbancoolab, an AI start-up focusing on applied computational creativity: yes they can. And to prove the point, they’ve launched ten new images by their ‘AI artist’ STiCH, inspired by iconic artist Jean-Michel Basquiat.

Urbancoolab describes STiCH as an ‘artist, machine, design researcher and artist intelligence’, and say it’s spent over 730 hours immersing itself into the life of Basquiat. The resulting images feature famous faces such as Idris Elba, Michelle Obama, Jay-Z and Tupac, and celebrate Basquiat’s artistic oeuvre as well as his history, personality and influence.

“Our team met the challenge to see how an AI machine with no emotion can learn to express itself with gestural abstraction while remaining to be visually intuitive,” says Urbancoolab founder Idris Mootee.

“We’re focusing on Basquiat as his work continues to inspire others, and his message continues to be relevant. There would be nothing more incredible than to have Basquiat’s work continue. His conceptual and aesthetic appeal will always remain strong because of the inherent emotional depth and power it communicates.”

Untitled (1bc639f5-fcc0) (Idris Elba). All images courtesy of the artist.

Untitled (1bc639f5-fcc0) (Idris Elba). All images courtesy of the artist.

Untitled (6e22f42e-cbd6) (Michelle Obama)

Untitled (6e22f42e-cbd6) (Michelle Obama)

Untitled (27f3a102-5b74) (Method Man)

Untitled (27f3a102-5b74) (Method Man)

Untitled (2d2c71fd-024a) (Tupac)

Untitled (2d2c71fd-024a) (Tupac)

Untitled (c92fa065-913e) (Jay-Z)

Untitled (c92fa065-913e) (Jay-Z)

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